When JavaScript dominates the conversations around the front end, it leads to some developers feeling inadequate. In a comment on Robin Rendle’s “Front-end development is not a problem to be solved,” Nils writes:

Maybe the term front-end developer needs some rethinking. When I started working, front-end was mostly HTML, CSS, and some JavaScript. A good front-end developer needed to be able to translate a Photoshop layout to a pixel perfect website. Front end today is much much more. If you want to learn front-end development, people seem to start learning git, npm, angular, react, vue and all of this is called front-end development.

I am a designer and I think I’m pretty good at HTML and CSS, but that’s not enough anymore to be a front-end developer.

Robin himself gave himself the job title, Adult Boy That Cares Too Much About Accessibility and CSS and Component Design but Doesn’t Care One Bit About GraphQL or Rails or Redux but I Feel Really Bad About Not Caring About This Other Stuff Though.

It’s also frustrating to people in other ways. Remember Lara Schenk’s story of going in for a job interview? She met 90% of the listed qualifications, only to have the interview involve JavaScript algorithms. She ultimately didn’t get the job because of that. Not everybody needs to get every job they interview for, but the issue here is that front-end developer isn’t communicating what it needs to as an effective job title.

It feels like an alternate universe some days.

Two “front-end web developers” can be standing right next to each other and have little, if any, skill sets in common. That’s downright bizarre to me for a job title so specific and ubiquitous. I’m sure that’s already the case with a job title like designer, but front-end web developer is a niche within a niche already.

Jina Bolton is a front-end developer and designer I admire. Yet, in a panel discussion I was on with her a few years ago, she admits she doesn’t think of herself with that title:

When I was at Apple, my job title when I first started out there was front-end developer. Would I call myself that now? No, because it’s become such a different thing. Like, I learned HTML/CSS, I never learned JavaScript but I knew enough to work around it. Now—we’re talking about job titles—when I hear “front-end developer,” I’m going to assume you know a lot more than me.

It seems like, at the time, that lack of a JavaScript focus made Jina feel like she’s less skilled than someone who has the official title of front-end developer. I think people would be lucky to have the skills that Jina has in her left pinky finger, but hey that’s me. Speaking to Jina recently, she says she still avoids the title specifically because it leads to incorrect assumptions about her skill set.

Mandy Michael put a point on this better than anyone in her article, Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript?”:

What I don’t understand is why it’s okay if you can “just write JS”, but somehow you’re not good enough if you “just write HTML and CSS”.

When every new website on the internet has perfect, semantic, accessible HTML and exceptionally executed, accessible CSS that works on every device and browser, then you can tell me that these languages are not valuable on their own. Until then we need to stop devaluing CSS and HTML.

Mandy uses her post for peacemaking. She’s telling us, yes, there is a divide, but no, neither side is any more valuable than the other.

Source : CSS-Tricks

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